tiny house living

7 Free Floor Plans for School Bus to Tiny Home Conversions

Have you ever dreamed of packing all your possessions in an old school bus and heading for the hills? Well dream no more! Here are some free floor plans for your school bus conversion to help you start your project of a lifetime. Get those creative juices flowing and check out these clever conversions, creative uses of space and all round wonderful ideas.

School bus floor plan free 2

Great ideas from Gone Camping.

School bus floor plan free

Just one of the great ideas on the forum at Bus Nut.

Tiny home living

Get the full story with pictures on this great build at Hank Bought a Bus.

Tiny house ideas

Another great plan from Skoolie.com for your school bus  to tiny house conversion.

Pimp my School bus conversion plan

This free school bus conversion floor plan comes to you from Pimp My School Bus.

Tiny home floor plan

Custom Evolution Coach bring you this great free floor plan for your bus conversion.

school bus tiny house floor plans free

Decor Bold brings you this amazing school bus conversion floor plan.

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About

Nikki is an author and writer specializing in green living ideas and tips, adventure travel, upcycling, and all things eco-friendly. She's traveled the globe, swum with sharks and been bitten by a lion (fact). She lives in a tiny town with a fat cat and a very bad dog.

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3 thoughts on “7 Free Floor Plans for School Bus to Tiny Home Conversions

    1. Carlos

      Hey Joshua, I’m researching for my Skoolie conversion and I think the average number is probably around $20,000. Of course, that depends on what bus you find, what you plan to do with it and if you do the work or not. I hope that helps

      Reply
    2. dwest

      We purchased a 12 year old, 38-ft long International DT466E with just under 80K miles. It was $10-thousand. Very minimal rust. A real gem which could’ve been put back in service. Ten thousand may seem like a lot, but not when you consider the value in terms of quality. We could have very easily purchased another bus for half what we paid, then poured in thousands for engine repairs, body upgrades to mitigate rust, etc. So it was six of one, half-a-dozen of another.
      Next, we did the solar install first (after the obvious gutting process of removing seats, etc). The real estate on the roof dictated the rest of the system. We have twelve 100-watt panels up there. That 1.2 kW then shaped the rest of the system. The average daily sunlight in our area, zone 5, is about four hours. So we calculated our battery bank recharge rate, from absolute flat, to fully charged, to be within this four hour window. And we came up with 200 Ah. The system is also a 24-volt system, so, if you go with 12 volts that would be a 400 Ah battery bank. We went with 24 volts because of voltage drop to long runs of DC for lights etc., and the slight efficiency improvement for our inverter. Total cost of our electrical system (so far) is just over $8-thousand. With the tax credits from our state and fed-govt, the bottom line was just under $5-thousand.
      And that’s as far as I have got with this conversion so far. Just under $20-thousand. We estimated spending right around 50 to 60 thousand, or about the same as an average down payment for a house. So far we are right in middle of our goal posts for budget. The “hard” part is actually doing the work. I’m all by myself on this and we just had an addition to our family. So, the bus has been sitting for almost a year! Perhaps when our son gets older he can help me pick up where I left off 😉

      Reply

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